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 Cherán Uprising

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Hound Dog
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PostSubject: Cherán Uprising   Thu 02 Jun 2011, 11:48

It seems that illegal loggers and drug dealers are in cahoots in the forests around Cherán and, according the news reports I have just read, the Cherán Purépechas,sick of the extreme criminal activity of the colluding gangs of illegal loggers desecrating the pine forests that comprise their patrimony and the La Famila thugs using the loggers to transport their meth garbage, have taken law enforcement into their own hands, raided the Cherán police department for weaponry and sealed off the town from criminal elements. I hope this is true. The same sort of uprising is taking place in Chiapas where Zapatista operatives are organizing poor Chiapas indigenous to fight the Zetas and their cronies who are determined to take over the Chiapas/Guatemala border and the Peten Region of Guatemala. Time for a popular uprising to take revenge. The indigenous in Chiapas are not to be trifled with and I wish them and their brothers and sisters in Michoacan luck. It´s an uphill battle.
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Peter
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PostSubject: Re: Cherán Uprising   Thu 02 Jun 2011, 13:07

La Familia thugs?? Are you sure? You may well be right but the media seldom makes it clear who is who, they want you to associate all of the cartel guys together and say All Bad, bad, bad. The worse part is the instability created when they take out some leaders of any given group and other factions then want to "muscle in" and that's when all hell breaks loose.

When the media reports about drug thugs you are supposed to think of the local group and say Bad Bad, encourage them to cut them down, then experience the instability that follows and believe it all had to do with those ugly cartel groups. If you read your own The Nation article you understand how that works, but I don't know if any of us actually knows why the govt forces want to create that instability.

For all I know it could the Zetas or some other group in Cherán trying to muscle in on La Familia, or it might be them themselves. If you don't know for sure you just may be helping carry out the instability agenda by guessing who it is. but if you do know for a fact who is doing what to whom it may not be wise and healthy to tell anyone.

There are other articles about the Cherán unrest on this board already. If you care to read more then follow this link - http://amigo.forumotion.com/t184-mexico-town-stands-up-to-drug-gangs-with-barricade . I only believe about half of what I see and perceive, and even less about what I read but at least it does give some idea what is going on. Knowing what disinfo tactics are used filters some of the crap.

I just hope that global policy summit report from last night is right about spelling out a new direction. Status quo really sucks.

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PostSubject: Re: Cherán Uprising   Sat 04 Jun 2011, 15:26

Peter wrote:
La Familia thugs?? Are you sure? You may well be right but the media seldom makes it clear who is who, they want you to associate all of the cartel guys together and say All Bad, bad, bad....

Well said Peter and I fully understand your point as in Chiapas we are subjected to the same misinformation from both adamant and vociferous rightists and leftists, a compromised media, state and federal governments with non-transparent agendas and traditional Chiapas-style Catholicism (the traditional village power structure in Colonial and post-Colonial times) versus Protestant Christian evangelical rightist religious zealots, a threat to that traditional power structure. Sorry if my post seemed to oversimplify very complex situations in both Michoacan and Chiapas. The longer we live in Chiapas the more we realize how naive we are but we are slowly catching on a little bit at a time.

I have never given this any serious thought but I wonder to what extent there are parallels between the poverty and rural nature of Michoacan and Chiapas and the growth of the Zapatista and, later, the La Familia movements. Both are cultures in flux with great disparity of wealth and both cultures are seemingly in transition to some degree of modernity. I am not trying to compare the Zapatista and La Familia phenomena but the fecund ground that gave birth to and nurtured them both. I am reminded of the U.S. state of Alabama where I was born and raised and which, in the 1940s and 1950s was dirt poor but emerging into a modern state. The Ku Klux Klan became very powerful among poor and vulnerable whites as African Americans sought equality of opportunity and the violent episodes carried out by the klan were meant to protect the favored political class of European Americans from that impending competition. From that conflict emerged militant contrary movements supporting, in turn, European and African Americans. All these movements seem to grow from discord and, if Alabama or a thousand other places are examples, these Mexican movements will pass as well. However, we may not live to see that.
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PostSubject: who's thugging who?   Sat 04 Jun 2011, 17:00

Our friend whose family is from the Uruapan area not too far from Cherán, commented last night that it is arguable who is in charge of what in that conflict... her mother's family reports great hardship with no supplies of food etc able to reach the town now isolated by the blockades staffed by narco supported rival villager groups. She agrees that the Cherán populace is repelling the bad guys and kicking them out of their forest lands, however, the foodstuff delivery vehicles are turned back before they can reach the Cherán community... literally laying siege to the village where the people are suffering big time from the lack of outside commerce. So the Cherán forests are secured, but at the price of adequate food!

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cheenagringo
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PostSubject: Re: Cherán Uprising   Sat 04 Jun 2011, 17:03

Other than descriptive posts made by the Dawg, I have no first hand knowledge of the topography/geography of Chiapas but Michoacan seems to me to have a good deal of similarity to Northern California, Oregon & Washington with sea ports and timber lands. These timbered areas seem to be attractive to those wishing to grow and harvest marijuana and hide meth labs. One has to make the assumption that a good deal of the chemicals necessary for the production of meth are coming into the nearby ports. Just last week, there were two shipments of chemicals (one of 54 tonnes and another of 60 tonnes) located in/near Manzanillo anf the same capabilities exist in/near Michoacan. It might be pure speculation as to the exact initial motivations to get into the business but one can safely bet that money and power were right in there.
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PostSubject: Re: Cherán Uprising   Sat 04 Jun 2011, 17:33

cheenagringo wrote:
Other than descriptive posts made by the Dawg, I have no first hand knowledge of the topography/geography of Chiapas but Michoacan seems to me to have a good deal of similarity to Northern California, Oregon & Washington with sea ports and timber lands. These timbered areas seem to be attractive to those wishing to grow and harvest marijuana and hide meth labs. One has to make the assumption that a good deal of the chemicals necessary for the production of meth are coming into the nearby ports. Just last week, there were two shipments of chemicals (one of 54 tonnes and another of 60 tonnes) located in/near Manzanillo anf the same capabilities exist in/near Michoacan. It might be pure speculation as to the exact initial motivations to get into the business but one can safely bet that money and power were right in there.

Well, Neil, I can assure you as a former long-time resident of rural Northern California and frequent visitor to Michoacan that Chiapas has these characteristics you describe in spades plus a porous border with the virtually lawless jungle-clad frontiers of northern and northwestern Guatemala where, it seems, the Zetas are asserting power the weakened Guatemalan government will be hardpressed to counter.

In the area of Southern Mexico and Northern Guatemala where poverty is extreme and employment impossible to obtain without connections, where are these young men and women to turn to avoid starvation if not to the cartels? Same as in poverty-stricken Northern California as I knew it in the 80s. The guys driving th Mercedes were selling drugs, the guys driving rusty old pickups were selling radishes.

Get serious.
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Peter
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PostSubject: Re: Cherán Uprising   Sat 04 Jun 2011, 18:32

It seems when we apply the term "narco" to situations like that in Cherán it is not to imply there are narcotics activity involved in this particular struggle but is a bugaboo label for strongarm activities occurring outside "official" channels. Determining who is the proper authority is made more difficult when the government refuses to get involved, as in Cherán.

Indeed, Dave's comment heard from close to home "it is arguable who is in charge of what in that conflict... " would seem to confirm that. The situation for the local people he describes is obviously the result of an effort orchestrated by powerful people outside of regular channels.

Quote :
...her mother's family reports great hardship with no supplies of food etc able to reach the town now isolated by the blockades staffed by narco supported rival villager groups. She agrees that the Cherán populace is repelling the bad guys and kicking them out of their forest lands, however, the foodstuff delivery vehicles are turned back before they can reach the Cherán community... literally laying siege to the village where the people are suffering big time from the lack of outside commerce.


With the well-being at stake of the indigenous poor land holders there why does the government withhold "regular channel" support? Is there a racial element involved as in Dawg's native Alabama? Or is it a matter of indigenous folk with a tenuous claim to their land rights when an enterprise challenges their claim? Withholding governmental resolutions would make them complicit to some extent, or not? What constrains them from action? Not being able to combat a superior strongarm faction or promises of economic gain for some of those in the official channel should all be considered.

The Global Drug War has had devastating consequences that have both politicized the "criminal" element and criminalized the political elements, so I would say Narco is perhaps the appropriate bugaboo to be applied to most any such instances when either side of the structure has fault in it.

Read http://amigo.forumotion.com/t215-the-global-commission-on-drug-policy-report

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Dave and Rosy
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PostSubject: Re: Cherán Uprising   Sat 04 Jun 2011, 19:05

I think Pete, from what we were told twice by our friend, the locals have gotten rid of the bad guys who were stealing their timber and damaging other crops... but the price has been the loss of traffic to the town... remember the Ruiz massacre of one group of 29 bad guys by another group of bad guys... here the folks are isolated and I have no idea why the "authorities" are not insuring free access to and from the town, but that is the case ... a nephew telephoned to relate the problems of no food on the shelves and roadblocks with armed guys outside of town discouraging travel...
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